Pugh, whom the president and ceo had often told him in 1941, «If you are loyal to (see`s) and you do a good job, your future is secure.» Laurence See, president of the company from 1951 to 1969, had the practice of not firing employees except for cause, which was then sued by Charles See, who succeeded Laurence See as president. Throughout his employment, there was never any formal and written criticism of his work and no note that there was a problem to be corrected, nor a warning that disciplinary action had been considered. . . .